BHS Connect https://bhsconnect.net Tue, 25 Jun 2019 15:51:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.2.2 https://bhsconnect.net/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/bhs-logo-111x111-100x100.png BHS Connect https://bhsconnect.net 32 32 Women Paint Over Own Avatars to Improve Mental Health https://bhsconnect.net/women-paint-over-own-avatars-to-improve-mental-health/ Tue, 25 Jun 2019 15:51:00 +0000 https://bhsconnect.net/women-paint-over-own-avatars-to-improve-mental-health/ How we view our bodies is often influenced by popular culture and each one of our’s social environment. Young women, in particular, tend to suffer from poor “body image,” which can result in depression, eating disorders, and all kinds of other mental issues. Researchers at the University of Missouri wanted to see whether letting women...

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How we view our bodies is often influenced by popular culture and each one of our’s social environment. Young women, in particular, tend to suffer from poor “body image,” which can result in depression, eating disorders, and all kinds of other mental issues.

Researchers at the University of Missouri wanted to see whether letting women view their own bodies from a different, more abstract perspective can influence their own body image in a positive way.

The team used an optical scanner to whole-body image women between the ages of 18 and 25. Accurate 3D representations were then created, which the women could digitally paint over using a Photoshop-like program. They were asked to used different colors to paint over different ares of the body that they tend to appreciate, whether for aesthetic, utilitarian, or other reasons.

“In digitally painting their avatars, women could think about how, for example, their thighs help them run or how their arms can help hold others in an embrace,” explained Ramseyer Winter, one of the researchers, in a press release. “It provided the participants a way to visual their bodies in a completely different way. It allowed the participants to recognize how our bodies are much more than a size or a number on a scale.”

The team evaluated the women before, after, and at three months following the experiment, and they discovered that the participants improved their self-image and had decreased signs of depression and anxiety.

“While more research still needs to be done on the relationship between the 3D image intervention we used and its impact on mental health, we did see a significant effect on body appreciation,” Winter added. “Prior research has shown that body appreciation is related to depression and anxiety, which leads us to think that we are on the right track in creating an intervention that can improve not only body image, but mental health as well.”

Next steps will include testing this approach on women with more severe cases of body image-related depression.

Here’a v video from University of Missouri about the research:

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Study in journal Mental Health & Prevention: Is body appreciation a mechanism of depression and anxiety? An investigation of the 3-Dimensional Body Appreciation Mapping (3D-BAM) intervention

Via: University of Missouri

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Tiny Implant Driven by Bluetooth Delivers Drugs Inside Body https://bhsconnect.net/tiny-implant-driven-by-bluetooth-delivers-drugs-inside-body/ Tue, 25 Jun 2019 15:04:31 +0000 https://bhsconnect.net/tiny-implant-driven-by-bluetooth-delivers-drugs-inside-body/ Many drugs come with complicated dosing regimens, making it difficult for patients to keep track of when it is time to take the next pill. Those taking drugs for hypertension, rheumatism, and other conditions can have very personalized schedules that require accurate timing. Researchers at Houston Methodist hospital have now developed an implantable device that...

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Many drugs come with complicated dosing regimens, making it difficult for patients to keep track of when it is time to take the next pill. Those taking drugs for hypertension, rheumatism, and other conditions can have very personalized schedules that require accurate timing. Researchers at Houston Methodist hospital have now developed an implantable device that can deliver a drug on its own, precisely when needed, and at the accurate dosage.

Unlike most previous drug delivery implants, this new device has no pumps, valves, or even a power supply. It works thanks to a nanofluidic membrane through which a drug can be diffused by changing the electric field applied to it. The device can release a drug slowly and evenly, keeping its concentration at a certain level and avoiding unnecessary dips and falls that can result in complications.

Using a Bluetooth device, the implant can be set to administer a drug at different rates, a change that can occur automatically whenever necessary.

To test whether this technology can survive under extreme conditions and work for long periods of time, the researchers plan on sending their implant to the International Space Station for a thorough evaluation.

The researchers have already tested the technology in vivo on animals, but tests in humans are still in the works.

“We see this universal drug implant as part of the future of health care innovation. Some chronic disease drugs have the greatest benefit of delivery during overnight hours when it’s inconvenient for patients to take oral medication. This device could vastly improve their disease management and prevent them from missing doses, simply with a medical professional overseeing their treatment remotely,” said Alessandro Grattoni, Ph.D., corresponding author of the paper in Lab on a Chip and chair of the department of nanomedicine at Houston Methodist Research Institute.

Study in Lab on a Chip: Remotely controlled nanofluidic implantable platform for tunable drug delivery

Via: Houston Methodist

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Tailor-Made Prosthetic Liners Can Help Amputees Walk More Comfortably https://bhsconnect.net/tailor-made-prosthetic-liners-can-help-amputees-walk-more-comfortably/ Tue, 25 Jun 2019 13:40:39 +0000 https://bhsconnect.net/tailor-made-prosthetic-liners-can-help-amputees-walk-more-comfortably/ Researchers from the University of Bath in the UK have developed a new method for creating highly accurate and comfortable prosthetic liners. Their work demonstrates that by using a state-of-the-art scanner, along with a new manufacturing technique, they can create prosthetic liners out of soft neoprene materials. This is an exciting development for those that...

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Researchers from the University of Bath in the UK have developed a new method for creating highly accurate and comfortable prosthetic liners. Their work demonstrates that by using a state-of-the-art scanner, along with a new manufacturing technique, they can create prosthetic liners out of soft neoprene materials. This is an exciting development for those that use prosthetic limbs, and can one day help improve comfort and use of prostheses.

After an amputation, an individual’s residual limb can change in shape and size during the healing process, which can last as long as 12 to 18 months. These changes lead to the prosthetic liner, which goes between the residual limb and the prosthetic device, to fit poorly. Poorly fitted liners can result in tissue damage, as well as pain and discomfort, and it is not uncommon for patients to abandon using prostheses for these reasons. To address this challenge, the Bath research team sought to develop new, highly accurate and soft prosthetic liners.

Their new approach leverages state-of-the-art scanners to capture the 3D shape of the residual limb. The shape is used to create a digital model of the residual limb, which in turn is used to design the personalized prosthetic liner. The liner is manufactured from neoprene, the same material used in wetsuits, using a cryogenic machining technique, which does not require making molds, a slow and labor-intensive process.

The researchers demonstrated the power of this approach with a case study, developing prosthetic liners for a patient named John Roberts, who had a lower limb amputation. John experienced his residual limb changing shape after amputation, which caused it to blister and get irritated. He used to wear multiple socks along with a silicone liner. Now, he can simply wear the single neoprene liner, since it fits so well. This results in a more comfortable fit and allows him to fit the prosthetic limb much faster, in case of an emergency.

The researchers also inserted pressure sensors in the prosthetic limb, and studied John’s gait with and without the system. They found the new liner significantly reduces the pressure on the residual limb, making it more comfortable to walk.

Via: University
of Bath

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PhotoniCare Looks Behind Ear Drums to Help Diagnose Ear Infections https://bhsconnect.net/photonicare-looks-behind-ear-drums-to-help-diagnose-ear-infections/ Mon, 24 Jun 2019 17:26:40 +0000 https://bhsconnect.net/photonicare-looks-behind-ear-drums-to-help-diagnose-ear-infections/ Middle ear infections are one of the most common reasons for visits to the pediatrician. However, because the middle ear is hidden from view by the ear drum, physicians must diagnose based on symptoms and a limited physical exam — and when patients have ambiguous or borderline symptoms, accurate diagnosis can be challenging. PhotoniCare’s TOMi...

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Middle ear infections are one of the most common reasons for visits to the pediatrician. However, because the middle ear is hidden from view by the ear drum, physicians must diagnose based on symptoms and a limited physical exam — and when patients have ambiguous or borderline symptoms, accurate diagnosis can be challenging.

PhotoniCare’s TOMi Scope uses near-infrared light waves to provide 3D views beyond the ear drum into the middle ear, allowing physicians to visualize and better diagnose middle ear infections.

Co-founder and CEO Ryan Shelton, Ph.D. answered a few of our questions about his company’s beginnings, its technology, and what he expects for his firm’s future.

Cici Zhou, Medgadget: Tell me about the founding team members. How did PhotoniCare start, and what was the inspiration?

Ryan Shelton: I founded the company with Stephen Boppart [Professor and Head of the Biophotonics Imaging Laboratory at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign], and Ryan Nolan, an engineer and clinical trial specialist. I was doing postdoctoral research in Dr. Boppart’s medical imaging lab leading a project on an imaging technology with Ryan N. We were exploring a few potential clinical indications and during this same time my oldest son, Jack, now 7 years old, was going through his first year of life. He had 10 office visits with multiple rounds of antibiotics before finally getting a referral to an ENT for surgery. I got to experience first-hand the challenges and frustrations that accompany the current standard of care for ear infections. That experience certainly drove my passion for using our technology platform to improve care for this extremely common disease.

Medgadget: In plain terms, how does the TOMi Scope technology work? Are there studies showing that it is better at helping with diagnosis than traditional otoscopes?

Shelton: The TOMi Scope contains two important imaging modes in one familiar handheld package. It provides a high-quality video otoscope with capabilities for digital export and real-time sharing with parents & patients. It also provides a depth imaging mode that uses near-infrared light to image through the eardrum and directly visualize the contents of the middle ear. Current otoscopes misdiagnose the presence of fluid 50% of the time and give little or no indication of the type of fluid, yet proper diagnosis of both the presence and type of fluid are extremely important for ensuring patients receive proper treatment.

We have several publications on the technology showing the ability to detect and characterize fluid in the middle ear. We have a manuscript currently under review that shows 90%+ sensitivity and specificity for detecting fluid through the eardrum in the pediatric population. The biggest shortcoming for other technologies trying to address this problem is that nearly all of them measure the eardrum in some way. We believe that is the wrong approach. The disease lives in the middle ear, so the middle ear is what we need to assess to make an accurate diagnosis. Unlike competing technologies, we directly visualize the middle ear contents. We are not measuring the eardrum as a proxy for middle ear health.

Medgadget: At what stage is the company today?

Shelton : Today, the company has finalized development of the device and we are in the regulatory process. We keep a lean team of around 5 [full time employees]. We’ve raised less than $2M of private capital (along with $4.5M in grant funds) to get where we are now and should be closing a commercial-stage financing soon. The device has been piloted at 4 clinical sites and we have a long waiting list of additional providers that would like to participate in our upcoming beta program.

Medgadget: What are some of the biggest challenges facing the team, whether it’s on the technology or business side?

Shelton: The team is preparing for a growth phase, so making sure we attract the right team members during that phase will be critical. The team makes and breaks any enterprise, and we are always looking for stellar team members that have a passion for improving healthcare at the front lines. One ever-present hurdle in our industry, and especially in primary care, is market access. We have been working hard to ensure that we have the proper channel partners (we closed a distribution deal in Japan earlier this year) and value proposition to effectively access the market, but that will always be a challenge we are devoting mind power and resources toward.

Medgadget: Looking to the next 5 years, what are the biggest goals for PhotoniCare?

Shelton: We are incredibly excited about the next 5 years. Five years from now we expect to be seen as the next standard of care for ear health in primary care, urgent care, and retail settings. We expect to have additional clinical trials completed and published, and we expect to have changed outcomes for millions of children and adults in [the] US, Japan, and EU. Additionally, one of the great things about our technology platform is that it truly is a platform… We have shown the ability to image the eye, skin, teeth, and oral mucosa in addition to the ear, so we are incredibly excited about the future as we grow our platform and make an enormous impact on efficiency and outcomes at the front lines of medicine.

Link: PhotoniCare website…

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Microrobot Developed for Delivery of Stem Cells to the Brain https://bhsconnect.net/microrobot-developed-for-delivery-of-stem-cells-to-the-brain/ Mon, 24 Jun 2019 15:25:33 +0000 https://bhsconnect.net/microrobot-developed-for-delivery-of-stem-cells-to-the-brain/ Researchers from Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology (DGIST) in South Korea have developed a new microrobot that can precisely deliver therapeutic cells to very specific parts of the brain. Their work, recently published in Science Robotics, demonstrates that neural stem cells can be cultured and differentiated on their robot and that the device...

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Researchers from Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology (DGIST) in South Korea have developed a new microrobot that can precisely deliver therapeutic cells to very specific parts of the brain. Their work, recently published in Science Robotics, demonstrates that neural stem cells can be cultured and differentiated on their robot and that the device can travel from the carotid artery into various parts of the brain. This development may one day provide an approach for treating a number of brain-related disorders.

Delivery of living cells into the brain has been challenging, due to rapid loss of transplanted stem cells, and risks related to injecting directly into the brain. To address these problems, the Korean researchers developed a non-invasively controlled microrobot, which can travel through the blood stream and deliver the cells precisely into brain tissue.

The device is fabricated using 3D laser lithography, and is designed to have a helical shape to travel through the body more easily. It can be manipulated by a magnet, allowing the researchers to move it through the body non-invasively using an external magnetic field. The device is also porous, which helps the attachment and proliferation of the stem cells.

Two of the major experiments the researchers demonstrated was that they could culture hippocampal neural stem cells on the microrobot, and guide them to differentiate into various neural cell types. They also demonstrated, in a cadaveric rat brain, that they can use a magnetic field to guide the microrobot through the various arteries of the brain, to deliver the cells in precisely the right area.

In a press release, Professor Hongsoo Choi, who was involved in the research, said “Through this research we hope to increase the treatment efficiency and success rate for Alzheimer and central neural diseases, which couldn’t be approached through the existing method of stem cell treatment. Through continuous follow-up research with hospitals and related companies, we will do our best to develop a microrobot-based precise treatment system that can be used in actual hospital and clinical sites.”

The study in Science Robotics: Magnetically actuated microrobots as a platform for stem cell transplantation

Via: DGIST

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Advice for Medical Graduates – 33 Charts https://bhsconnect.net/advice-for-medical-graduates-33-charts/ Fri, 21 Jun 2019 15:04:12 +0000 https://bhsconnect.net/advice-for-medical-graduates-33-charts/ Every year that physicians have used social media, we’ve been offering advice for medical graduates. Tips for surviving the unsurvivable are almost too numerous to follow on Twitter. They take the shape of a virtual Little Engine That Could. “I think you can. I think you can,” we tell them. But the reality that few of...

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Every year that physicians have used social media, we’ve been offering advice for medical graduates. Tips for surviving the unsurvivable are almost too numerous to follow on Twitter. They take the shape of a virtual Little Engine That Could. “I think you can. I think you can,” we tell them.

But the reality that few of us ever like to disclose is that change is hard. In fact, my advice might be to buckle up.

This year’s move from medical school to residency will be just one of many transitions that this generation will face. Our field will change faster over the coming decades than at any point in history. Disruption of the foundational elements of how we frame disease and therapeutics will occur by the year rather than by the century. And the ability to adapt to a rapidly changing environment will be a defining feature of this medical generation.

Medical life within this generation will be a series of real-time upgrades. Doctors will all be endless newbies. Advice for medical graduates will become more challenging over time. 

Beyond the predictable basics of ‘drink more water’ and ‘listen to the patient’ there are few among us who can help these young doctors plan for what’s ahead.

In 2012 when Eric Topol delivered the commencement address to the graduating class of Baylor College of Medicine he was asked what would mark a key attribute of a medical school candidate today. His prescient response: Flexibility.

Change and transition is hard. But we might look beyond survival and see the unique opportunity that we have at this point in our profession’s history.

Congratulations and welcome to the medical generation of endless newbies.

If you like this you might like the 33 charts medical education archive

Image via the National Library of Medicine

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Stretchable E-Tattoo for Long-Term Heart Monitoring https://bhsconnect.net/stretchable-e-tattoo-for-long-term-heart-monitoring/ Fri, 21 Jun 2019 14:16:38 +0000 https://bhsconnect.net/stretchable-e-tattoo-for-long-term-heart-monitoring/ Researchers at the University of Texas at Austin have developed a wearable heart monitor which can assess heart health over several days. The research team call the device an “e-tattoo” and claim that its stretchability makes it more comfortable and convenient to wear compared with previously developed devices. The device is the first stretchable, ultrathin...

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Researchers at the University of Texas at Austin have developed a wearable heart monitor which can assess heart health over several days. The research team call the device an “e-tattoo” and claim that its stretchability makes it more comfortable and convenient to wear compared with previously developed devices. The device is the first stretchable, ultrathin sensor that can provide both electrocardiography (ECG) and seismocardiography (SCG) measurements.

For patients suffering from or at risk of heart disease, monitoring their heart health is important. However, getting an ECG exam means that they have to visit their doctor’s office and also doesn’t allow for continuous measurement over a number of days. In addition, ECG readings alone, which provide information on the electrical activity of the heart, aren’t as informative and valuable as a combined ECG/SCG exams, which also provide information on chest vibrations associated with the heartbeat, and indicate how accurate the ECG measurements are.

To address these issues, researchers have been developing wearable sensors that patients can use to keep track of their heart health over time. However, to date, many of these have been bulky and/or uncomfortable. This issue inspired the University of Texas researchers to design a sleek and comfortable alternative.

The flexible
e-tattoo sensor consists of polyvinylidene fluoride, which is piezoelectric, meaning
that it can generate electricity when it is deformed. The slim, stretchable device
is attached to the chest, and the system incorporates a method to map chest vibrations
to help find the optimal place to attach the sensor.

The device is powered remotely by a user’s smartphone, and it can be worn for several days, providing non-stop heart monitoring. By offering both ECG and SCG measurements, the e-tattoo provides a more accurate assessment of heart health. “We can get much greater insight into heart health by the synchronous collection of data from both sources,” said Nanshu Lu, one of the investigators involved in the study.

The researchers claim that as the device is flexible and thin, it is more comfortable and convenient to wear compared with previously developed wearable heart monitors. The team has also recently developed an app to accompany the device, which can display a representation of the heart beating in real time, and store all the collected data.

Study in Advanced Science: A
Chest‐Laminated Ultrathin and Stretchable E‐Tattoo for the Measurement of
Electrocardiogram, Seismocardiogram, and Cardiac Time Intervals

Via: The
University of Texas at Austin

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Think pink(socks) at Digital Health Summer Schools 2019 https://bhsconnect.net/think-pinksocks-at-digital-health-summer-schools-2019/ Fri, 21 Jun 2019 14:00:21 +0000 https://bhsconnect.net/think-pinksocks-at-digital-health-summer-schools-2019/ This year’s Digital Health Summer Schools is to turn a bright shade of pink as it welcomes US native Nick Adkins. Adkins is the founder of the pinksocks movement – a “gifting” community which prides itself on promoting human connections. Pinksocks is a not-for-profit organisation which encourages members to gift pink socks to others in order...

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This year’s Digital Health Summer Schools is to turn a bright shade of pink as it welcomes US native Nick Adkins.

Adkins is the founder of the pinksocks movement – a “gifting” community which prides itself on promoting human connections.

Pinksocks is a not-for-profit organisation which encourages members to gift pink socks to others in order to build networks and contacts.

It was a trip to The Burning Man Festival in 2010 which kicked off the idea.

Speaking to Digital Health News ahead of Summer Schools next month, Adkins said that he had been a “suit and tie” person for the majority of his life as a healthcare CEO, but a trip to the festival changed his life.

He said: “In 2010 I went to The Burning Man Festival in the desert, I came back and said ‘I’m done, I don’t want to wear a suit and tie anymore’.”

It was one of the festival’s principles that peaked Adkins’s interest – “gifting” an act which the festival sees as an “unconditional” value.

The website adds: “Gifting does not contemplate a return or an exchange for something of equal value.”

It was this principle that lead to Adkins to start pinksocks with friend, and co-founder at a healthtech startup, Andrew Richards.

The pair attended a health event in Chicago in 2015 where their brightly coloured socks proved to be a hit and the rest, they say, is history.

Adkins explains how the socks attract people’s attention, encouraging people to “connect” with each other.

A number of people in the NHS IT community are part of the pinksocks “tribe” and Adkins said he is looking to bring the sense of collaboration to this year’s Summer Schools.

He said he was hoping to lead some exercises which will help “prompt conversations” between delegates.

You’ll see Nick at Digital Health Summer Schools, which this year is being held at the University of Leeds on 18 and 19 July.

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IMS MAXIMS and Better join forces to provide e-prescribing software https://bhsconnect.net/ims-maxims-and-better-join-forces-to-provide-e-prescribing-software/ Fri, 21 Jun 2019 11:00:26 +0000 https://bhsconnect.net/ims-maxims-and-better-join-forces-to-provide-e-prescribing-software/ Electronic prescribing software will be easier to integrate into NHS trusts thanks to a new partnership. IMS MAXIMS has joined forces with Better by Marand to become a reseller of is e-prescribing system, OPENeP. The move will give NHS trusts the option to buy an e-prescribing system that integrates seamlessly with the MAXIMS software suite....

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Electronic prescribing software will be easier to integrate into NHS trusts thanks to a new partnership.

IMS MAXIMS has joined forces with Better by Marand to become a reseller of is e-prescribing system, OPENeP.

The move will give NHS trusts the option to buy an e-prescribing system that integrates seamlessly with the MAXIMS software suite.

The model has already been successfully adopted by Taunton and Somerset NHS Foundation Trust, a global digital exemplar (GDE), which uses MAXIMS.

The trust is due to go live with OPENeP in the summer.

Leesa Ewing, commercial director at IMS MAXIMS, said: “E-prescribing is recognised as one of the key components of an electronic patient record (EPR).

“The partnership with Better by Marand will enable us to integrate our EPR with OPENeP, and to create a seamless experience for clinicians.

“That should give trusts additional confidence that they will achieve the well-documented benefits of e-prescribing, which include fewer medication errors and, critically, improved patient safety.”

Both companies have committed to using open architecture and standards to allow their systems to interoperate with others, in line with Secretary for Health and Social Care Matt Hancock’s call for integration.

Electronic prescribing – or e-prescribing –  is regarded as crucial for improving patient safety by reducing medication errors associated with hand-written notes.

The Government in 2018 committed £75million to accelerate the roll-out of e-prescribing.

To date, 13 trusts have received funding and 48 bis are being considered for a second wave of funding.

Roko Malkoč , product manager of OPENeP, added: “It is our common goal with IMS MAXIMS to improve outcomes for patients. We both work closely with the medical staff to make sure that we have identified the problems to be solved and prevent unnecessary errors.”

IMS MAXIMS already has a partnership in place with JAC so they can continue to use its specialist pharmacy stock-control capabilities.

Taunton and Somerset NHS Foundation Trust will use JAC software to run its pharmacy when it goes live with its new e-prescribing system.

In March controlled drugs became available on the Electronic Prescription Service for the first time, following a successful trial.

The decision means patients will be able to have their prescriptions sent electronically from their GP to their pharmacy, rather than having to carry a paper copy.

Schedule 2 and 3 controlled drugs, excluding oral liquid methadone, are now available electronically.

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NHS England chief information officer Will Smart ‘set to move on’ https://bhsconnect.net/nhs-england-chief-information-officer-will-smart-set-to-move-on/ Fri, 21 Jun 2019 09:45:13 +0000 https://bhsconnect.net/nhs-england-chief-information-officer-will-smart-set-to-move-on/ Will Smart, chief information officer (CIO) for health and care in England, looks set to move on after three years in the role, Digital Health News understands. Sources have told Digital Health News that Smart is expected to shortly announce he is leaving his role as part of the wholesale shake-up of national NHS IT...

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Will Smart, chief information officer (CIO) for health and care in England, looks set to move on after three years in the role, Digital Health News understands.

Sources have told Digital Health News that Smart is expected to shortly announce he is leaving his role as part of the wholesale shake-up of national NHS IT leadership, resulting from the merger of NHS England and NHS Improvement and creation of NHSX, the new agency responsible for digital.

His departure would be the latest in a string of high-profile national IT leaders from NHS England leaving the NHS.

Matthew Swindells, Smart’s former boss and head of IT at NHSE, departed for Accenture in May, while former chief digital officer Juliet Bauer left to join online GP start-up Livi in April.

Inderjit Singh, who reported to Smart, and led on the Local Health and Care Record Exemplar (LHCRE) programme and architecture and cyber security, announced he was leaving the NHS to join PA Consulting, last week.

If Smart’s departure is confirmed, and sources suggest its now just a discussion about terms, only chief clinical information officer (CCIO), Simon Eccles, would remain of the previous IT leadership team at NHSE.

One source told Digital Health News, “Will always said he’d do three years, which is up in August, and with Matthew [Swindells] having now gone it does seem the logical time for him to go.”

Matthew Gould, chief executive of NHSX is currently on a tour of the NHS, ahead of taking up the official position on 1 July.

Gould is also beginning a recruitment drive for a new Chief Technology Officer.

Prior to becoming the national NHS CIO, Smart was CIO at the Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust for six years.

As NHS CIO, Smart has been most closely associated with the Global Digital Exemplar programme (including the Royal Free) and the LHCRE programme, both high-profile policies championed by Matthew Swindells.

Smart was chair of judging panel for the Digital Health Awards 2019 earlier this month. He is due to speak at the Digital Health Summer Schools on 19 July.

NHS England has been repeatedly approached for comment and declined to respond.

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